Chapati

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes about 14

INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole wheat flour plus 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, or 2 cups chapati flour
1 to 1¼ cups water
All-purpose flour, for rolling
Butter, for serving

DIRECTIONS

Mix the flour(s) in a large bowl. Add ½ cup of the water to the flour, and mix with your hand to combine. Add another ¼ cup water, and mix again. Continue adding the water, a little at a time, until the dough forms a ball. (The dough should take about 1 cup water.)

Now knead the dough vigorously on a clean, unfloured surface until the dough is moist, soft, and slightly sticky but doesn’t cling to clean hands or the work surface, about 5 minutes. If the dough is dry, dip your fingers into some water, and knead the water onto the surface, and let rest at least 10 minutes and up to 30 minutes.

When the dough has rested, prepare a small bowl of all-purpose flour and also flour your work surface. Break off a piece of dough a little smaller than a golf ball. Toss it in the bowl of flour, and then roll it between the palms of your hands to make a ball. Set the ball on the work surface, and flatten it into a 2-inch disk. Now roll the disk, flouring the work surface and dough round as needed, into a thin round 5 to 6-inches in diameter. Put the chapatti on a plate, and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap. Continue to roll all of the dough into chapattis, and stack them on a plate, pieces of plastic wrap between them.

Heat a griddle or frying pan (preference goes to cast iron) over medium-high heat. Place a chapati on a heated griddle or in the pan over medium-high heat, and cook until the top darkens slightly, and your see bubbles begin to form underneath the surface of the dough, about 1 minute. Now flip the chapatti with a spatula, and cook the other side until you see more bubbles, about 30 seconds.

If working on a gas stove, turn on a second burner to high. Using a pair of flat tongs, carefully pick up the chapati by the edge, and put it directly onto the burner. Cook until the chapati balloons and browns, 10 to 15 seconds. Then carefully turn it, using the tongs to pick it up by the very edge, and cook until the underside browns and the bread balloons again, 10 to 15 more seconds. Remove the chapati from the fire the tongs, or slide it off the griddle, put it on a plate, and rub with butter. Serve immediately while you continue cooking the remaining chapatis.

If working on an electric stove, cook the chapati on the griddle, or in the pan until the bubbles have begun to form on both sides. Then continue cooking the chapati, pressing down the edges of the round with a wad of paper towels as it balloons and turning it in a clockwise motion, until the chapati is well browned and swells like a balloon. Turn and do the same on the other side.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Cucumber Raita

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Serves 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

2¼ cups plain yogurt
1 large cucumber, peeled and shredded
1 fresh hot green chile, seeded and finely chopped
½ teaspoon ground toasted cumin
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon salt, to taste

DIRECTIONS

Whisk the yogurt in a bowl until smooth and lightened. Add the shredded cucumber, green chile, toasted cumin, and cayenne, and stir. Chill well, and stir in the salt just before serving.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Grape Raita

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Serves 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

3 cups plain yogurt
1½ cups seedless grapes, halved
2 teaspoons ground toasted cumin
2 teaspoons sugar
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper or paprika
Salt

For the tempering oil:

3 tablespoons canola oil
2 teaspoons cumin or black mustard seeds
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
6 fresh or 10 frozen curry leaves, torn into pieces (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Whisk the yogurt in a bowl until smooth and lightened. Stir in the grapes, and then the cumin, sugar, and cayenne or paprika. For the tempering oil, heat the oil with the cumin or mustard seeds in a small frying pan or kadai over medium-high heat. Cook until the cumin seeds darken or the mustard seeds crackle, 1 to 2 minutes. (Cover pan if using mustard seeds; they crackle and pop.) Add the fennel seeds and curry leaves, if using, and cook uncovered, stirring, 5 to 10 more seconds. (Stand back if using curry leaves; they spit when they hit the hot oil.) Pour over the yogurt, and chill well. Just before serving, stir in the salt.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Indian Lemonade

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes 1½ Quarts

INGREDIENTS

3-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and coarsely chopped
413 cup water
2 cups sugar
1 cup lemon, lime, or Key Lime juice, or any combination

DIRECTIONS

Combine the ginger and 13 cup water in a blender, and process to a paste. Strain through a very fine strainer or stainer lined with cheesecloth, and set this ginger essence aside. Bring the remaining 4 cups of water and the sugar to a boil in a medium saucepan. Remove for the heat, and let cool. Add the lemon or lime juice and the ginger juice. Pour into a container cover, and chill. Serve in tall glasses filled with ice.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Mint-Cilantro Chutney

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

1 cup fresh mint leaves
1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
½ bunch scallions, white parts only, trimmed
A ½-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into large pieces
Juice of 1 lime
¼ cup water

DIRECTIONS

Combine the ingredients in a blender and process until well blended.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Papadum

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

These lentil-bean wafers are eaten throughout India as a snack the way one would eat potato chips or popcorn in America. They may also be served along with or at the end of the meal. In India, for a snack, we would make a quick salad of onion and hot peppers tossed with lemon juice, served on top of roasted papadum. All you have to do is cook them quickly to make them crisp. In the north of India, they are preferred roasted, and, in the south, papadum is deep-fried.

DIRECTIONS

To roast the papadum on a gas stove, turn the flame to medium-high. Grasping a papadum with flat tongs, hold it over the flame so that the flame just touches it, and roast, turning constantly to ensure oven roasting, until the papadum loses its pale plastic look and turn an off-white color with some black spots, 30 seconds to a minute. Serve immediately.

If you have an electric stove, you’ll need to deep-fry the papadum: Pour over 2 inches of oil into a large saucepan or medium kadai, and heat to 360°F. (To gauge the temperature of the oil without using a thermometer, drop a piece of bread about 1-inch square into the hot oil over medium heat, turning often. When the oil reaches 360°F the bread should begin to brown almost immediately and turn golden brown all over – like a crouton – in about 30 seconds). Slide a papadum into the hot oil, and cook until it puffs and turns a sandy beige color (if it browns it’s overcooked), 3 to 5 seconds. Remove from the oil with tongs, and drain on paper towels while you fry the rest of the papadums.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Parathas Stuffed with Potato, Chiles, and Cilantro

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes about 12 Parathas

INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole wheat flour plus 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, or 2 cups chapati flour
Salt
1 to 1¼ cups water
1½ pounds boiling potaotes, boiled in their skins until tender (25 to 30 minutes) and cooked
½ cup very finely chopped red onion
1 fresh hot green chile, very finely chopped
1½ tablespoons very finely chopped fresh cilantro
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon garam masala
¼ teaspoon cumin seeds or ½ teaspoon carom seeds
Juice of ½ lemon or lime
All purpose-flour, for rolling
Canola oil, for cooking
Butter, for serving

DIRECTIONS

Mix the flour(s) and 1 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Add ½ cup of the water to the flour mixture, and mix with your hand to combine. Add another ½ cup water, and mix again. Continue adding water, a little at a time, until the dough forms a ball. The dough should take about 1 cup of water.

Now knead the dough vigorously on a clean, unfloured work surface until the dough is moist, soft, and slightly sticky, but doesn’t cling to clean hands or the work surface, about 5 minutes. If the dough is try, dip your fingers into some water and knead the water into the dough. Put the dough into a clean bowl, cover with a clean damp kitchen towel pressed directly onto the surface, and let rest at 10 minutes or up to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel the potatoes and mash them roughly in your hands in a bowl. Add 1 teaspoon salt, the onion, chile, cilantro, spices, and lemon or lime juice, and mix well to form a fairly smooth mixture (there will be small lumps present).

When the dough has rested, set out a bowl of all-purpose flour and a small bowl of canola oil, with a spoon, on your work surface. Lightly flour your work surface as well.

Break off a piece of dough about the size of a gold ball. Toss it first in the bowl of flour, and then roll it between the palms of your hands to make a ball. Set the ball on your work surface, and flatten to a 2-inch disk. Now roll the disk, flouring the work surface and dough as needed, into a thin round 4½ to 5-inches in diameter. Mound about ¼ cup of the potato mixture into the center of the dough rough. Bring the edges of the up over the top of the filling, and press them together to make a pouch. Press down on the neck of the pouch with the palm of one hand to make a slightly rounded disk. Turn the disk in the bowl of flour, and roll it out again into a round about 6-inches in diameter. Continue to roll all of the remaining dough into parathas, and stack them on the plate with sheets of plastic wrap between them.

Heat a griddle or frying pan (preference goes to cast-iron) over medium-high heat. Place the dough round on the heated, ungreased griddle or in the pan, and cook until the dough darkens slightly and you see bubbles begin to form underneath the surface of the dough, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Now you flip the paratha with a spatula, and cook until the bubbles form again.

With the back of the spoon, coat the top of the paratha with oil. Flip, and coat the other side with oil. Now continue cooking, pressing gently on the bread the the back of the spoon and moving the spoon around in a circular motion to press the bread onto the pan for even browning. When the bottom of the bread has browned, flip and repeat. Do this a few times until both sides of the paratha are golden brown and very crisp, 2 to 3 minutes in total.

Remove the paratha from the pan and spread with butter. Serve immediately. Then continue on this way until all of the parathas have been cooked.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Spicy Mango Pickle

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes 1 quart

INGREDIENTS

3 medium green (unripe) mangoes, peeled and cut into small cubes
½ cup kosher salt
3 tablespoons turmeric
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 tablespoon black mustard seeds, coarsely ground in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder
½ tablespoon fenugreek seeds, coarsely ground
½ cup cayenne pepper
1 cup canola oil

DIRECTIONS

Put the mango cubes in a nonaluminum bowl, and sprinkle with the salt and half of the turmeric. Toss to coat all of the mango cubes. Spoon the mango into a clean jar, cap, and set in a sunny spot for 2 days, turning the jars up and down several times twice a day.

On the third day, empty the jar into a nonreactive colander and drain for about 30 minutes. Spread the mango out on muslin or an old kitchen towel, and let stand for 2 hours. (The turmeric will stain, so use something that you won’t mind seeing yellow.)

Combine the remaining turmeric with the fennel seeds, ground mustard seeds, ground fenugreek seeds, and cayenne in a nonreactive bowel. Add the mangoes and half of the oil. Stir to mix well.

Spoon into a dry, sterilized jar, and press down lightly to compact the mangoes. Add the remaining oil, and tightly cap the jar. Set in a sunny spot for 10 to 12 days, turning the jars up and down several times once every few days. After the twelfth day the pickle is ready for use, but it tastes better as it ages.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Sweet-and-Sour Eggplant Pickle

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes 1 quart

INGREDIENTS

1-pound Japanese or small Italian eggplants, or 1 large (1¼ to 1½ pound) eggplant, stemmed
2 teaspoons salt
1 cup rice wine vinegar
1½ cups loosely packed light brown sugar
1 cup canola oil
½ tablespoon chopped garlic
½ tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

DIRECTIONS

If using Japanese eggplants, cut them in half lengthwise and then crosswise into 2-inch sections. If using small Italian eggplants, quarter them lengthwise, and then cut into 2-inch sections. If you can only find a large eggplant, cut off the straight-sided upper half of the eggplant, and cut it lengthwise into six pieces; cut each piece in half crosswise. Then set the bottom half of the eggplant on one end, and cut off the rounded, outside edges in 4½-inch thick slices, discarding the central core. Cut the other pieces in half lengthwise and then crosswise into 2 to 2½-inch sections.

Sprinkle the eggplant slices with salt on a paper-towel-lined-tray, and let stand 2 hours. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, pour the vinegar over the brown sugar, and let stand to soften. Wipe the salt off the eggplant with paper towels. Heat the oil in a 12-inch frying pan over medium heat. Working in two batches, cook the eggplant, turning, until lightly browned and softened, 3 to 4 minutes. (Do not overcook, or the eggplant will fall apart.) Drain on paper towels.

Remove the pan from the heat, and stir the garlic, ginger, and cayenne in the oil. Return the eggplant to the pan, and swirl the pan to coat the eggplant with the spices. Let stand off the heat 5 minutes. Then add the vinegar-sugar mixture, bring to a simmer, and cook until the syrup is very bubble and thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, but not caramelized, about 15 minutes. Let stand until cooled completely to room temperature, spoon into a sterilized 1-quart jar, and refrigerate.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

Tamarind Chutney

January 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Makes about 1¼ cups

INGREDIENTS

1 tablespoon canola oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon fennel seeds
½ teaspoon asafetida (optional)
½ teaspoon Garam Masala
2 cups water
1¼ cups sugar
3 tablespoons tamarind concentrate

DIRECTIONS

Heat the oil and spices in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, and cook until the spices are fragrant and lightly toasted, about 1 minute. Whisk in the water, sugar, and tamarind concentrate until completely dissolved, and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to medium, and simmer until the sauce turns the color of chocolate and is thick enough to leave a trail on the back of a spoon, 20 to 30 minutes. (While still warm it will look like chocolate sauce, and it will thicken a bit as it cools.) Taste for seasoning, transfer to a covered plastic container, and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks or ladle into dry and sterilized jars and can according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

© Recipe Property of Suvir Saran

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